Putting The Hyper In Hyperbole: The Music Industry Will Be Over By 2018

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It is no secret that The New York Times is a sinking ship. So it is also no surprise that they have stepped up their game in hyperbolic, bloated Op-Eds. Yesterday, a man by the name of Charles Blow (I am trying to be mature here so stop the cackling) wrote the usual talk of old-people-who-do-not-get-the-music-industry-garbage that neglects facts in order to collect a paycheck from an old gray lady in midtown run by incompetent fools who have lost touch. Anyhow! Here is where the fun starts in his short-sighted opinion piece:


According to data from the Recording Industry Association of America,
since music sales peaked in 1999, the value of those sales, after
adjusting for inflation, has dropped by more than half. At that rate,
the industry could be decimated before Madonna’s 60th birthday.

(Note:
I wrote this column while listening to “The Miseducation of Lauryn
Hill,” the last truly great CD I ever bought. Every track is a gem.
When did I buy it? 1999.)”

Ahhh, yes! Another person who is old and hasn’t been passionate about music since 1999. I have news for you Mr. Blow it is not the music that has gotten old and stale it is your passion towards it. Many of us continue to be inspired by recently made records everyday because we are young, vibrant and on a constant quest for great music and knowledge. It is not that the music industry hasn’t turned out a great record since 1999 it is the passion in your heart towards it hasn’t felt anything since 1999. Do not blame an industry for your lack of passion towards something – look around and if you realize that yes the crappy music you may have pushed at you by major labels may be stale and old, there is plenty of great music made that is much better than Lauryn Hill ever year for the past decade. It probably just didn’t sell enough to get on your radar and pierce your old, jaded, poorly researched heart.

Where I also see your lack of passion being dimly lit is your quest to find the truth. With the new ideas put for by companies like TopSpin who help artists be able to deliver a pleasing user experience to record buying. As well as Spotify which finally promises to give music buyers a good purchasing experience that is superior to Torrent sites that the industry has been looking for the past decade to find. With these innovations we can finally expect to see some of the bleeding stop in this industry. But instead you choose to ignore these and countless other future innovations that your mind can’t imagine so you can prove a point to readers who will never research the ignorant garbage you spew. By writing a premature epitaph that sums up the story before it has even begun you put out another set of talking points for the out of touch set in their ivory towers (or in the NY Times case a disgusting metal eye sore next to port authority that I have to look at on my way to work everyday) to talk about and celebrate without stepping down to the ground floor to see the truth.

I suggest that before your next research challenged piece you take a look around before claiming the death of an industry and try to see that what is actually happening is a leveling of a playing field where an industry isn’t becoming decimated – the power is simply shifting. By writing ignorant pieces in a paper of record you choose to only spread hyperbole that helps to create a pessimism towards an industry that is about to unveil one of the most promising periods music has ever seen. I’ll happily take you to an InTrade bet on that as well.

Jesse Cannon is the editor of Musformation. He produces records at his studio Cannon Found Soundation. Follow him on Twitter at @JesseCannonMusF. For more info please visit his website.

  • xavier

    that article did nothing to prove him wrong. the music industry will die, and personally i am counting the days till it does

  • Tim

    Love the passion you show in this response mate. I totally agree. So many people in every aspect of life are so quick to jump ship, that they don’t even realise they are headed for paradise. Sorry that’s the best little metaphor I could come up with lol. Cut me some slack though it’s the last half hour of my 9 – 5 :]

  • Anonymous

    The RECORDING Industry will die but the MUSIC Industry will be fine and even better once they remove the INDUSTRY part.

  • Anonymous

    In the end it will remain an opinion piece.

  • Katonah Coster

    To add/in reply to the first Anonymous:
    The recording industry better not die out entirely, but it has to reinvent itself; it certainly can’t continue in its current model as we all know too well. We don’t want to lose the experience an artist can have inside a recording studio with the right people, particularly the expansion and development of an artist’s sound that the recording process enables. The problem is just that the mass market profit-driven approach is a colossal fail, and starves the art which the entire system depends on.
    We are definitely heading towards a more harmonious industry, one where every party can be happy. The music industry isn’t going anywhere.

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